“The Turntable” Final Thoughts – Letters From YOU!

I did not plan to make this article three parts. But out of anything I have ever written, it seems as though the turntable has resonated with more of you than anything else. I want to share some great comments I have received from YOU from the first two parts of “The Turntable.” Thanks so much. We can really all re-live our pasts!

David – Great article on The Turntable. Your words really resonated with me. I think you can relate to what I am about to say. When I was younger, my life seemed to be going at a full 78 rpm. Fast. Everything was good… smooth… easy. As I approached my 40’s and was deep into marriage, kids, earning an income, it slowed down to 45 rpm. Now 60, divorced, kind of lonely and getting older. Looking for the right soulmate and due to all of this, my life seems to be spinning at 33 rpm. My goal is to get it back on track. Maybe I will buy a new turntable. Do you think that will help?

Steve A.

Dave:

It may interest you to know that, when you are back in MD, I have a pretty big collection that I will be seriously downsizing… hopefully this year! Right now, they’re mostly in record boxes (I used to work at Record & Tape Collector’s on Coldspring, back in the late 70’s/early 80’s) and some moving boxes. Bottom line, they are packed well and tight, so, despite not having seen the light of day since the first Clinton Administration (not too much of an exaggeration for most of them), they should still be in good shape. At some point I may have a comprehensive catalog, which could come in handy, as I live in the boonies of Southern MD, now (Calvert County, about 20 miles south of Annapolis, on the Western shore of The Bay).

So let me know if you’re interested. Meanwhile, keep the vinyl spinning!

– Bob Landau

Hi Dave

I grew up off Patterson Ave. I’m digging your groove man!
Lenny

David,

Did this really happen? Because I know you pretty well, I was cracking up imagining you stalking this poor woman in the record store. I’m surprised she did not call the cops.

Sylvia Carlin

Dave, I love that Tommy was your first purchase with your new turntable! One of the greatest albums of all time! Europe ’72 by the Grateful Dead was one of my favorites. Must have gone through about 3 copies!
Josh Bernstein, DDS

David, I have four copies of Frampton Comes Alive if you are interested. Maybe you don’t want all four, but can you take just one off my hands? No charge for you. Just pay shipping from UK.

Steven S

David –

Could you please tell me exactly what turntable model you bought? I am itching to get one now and I totally trust you.

Jim Parrish

Dear David,

You understand life. I love what you are doing. What a great attitude. I would pay (almost) anything for you to be my personal coach or mentor. Are you taking clients? Please contact me at (left blank intentionally).

Amy (last name withheld for confidentiality)

Dave,

You brought back so many memories of my childhood with your turntable articles. I hope you are not done. Those were the days, weren’t they?

T.Z.

Dave, I read both articles. My equipment has always been high-end, a trait I passed down to my son, whose own system is in the $250k- plus range. We both still cherish vinyl.

Stan Sirody

Great stuff Dave! My son has my turntable as well as all of my vinyl. Luckily I have visitation rights!

Barry Z

The Turntable – Part 2

Thanks so much for all of your great comments from “The Turntable, part 1!” I never realized how much interest a turntable story would stir up. Or how much a turntable can shape one’s life.

I was facing a dilemma almost as soon as I bought my new turntable! You see, I wanted more vinyl and I wanted it immediately. As I said, I have a bunch of records (probably several hundred) back in Maryland in a dusty old back office. I will get back there as soon as I can to uncover them and bring them to Utah. But for now, I want more albums to play here!

I am not sure if you have priced LPs lately, but when you walk into any store that sells them you are looking at an average of $25-$30 apiece for new. That is not a misprint. And it’s not unusual to see a $35-$50 price tag if it’s pressed on extra heavy vinyl or maybe has some special color to it. Buying four new LPs for more than a hundred dollars? That is a lot of money to me.

I decided to hit up Craigslist to see if anyone was selling used. No real luck. I just missed a guy by a couple of weeks who apparently unloaded an entire collection for $3-$5 per album. Now that would have been sweet! By the time I messaged him he said his only remaining album was Robert Palmer. Maybe good, but I passed on that! I have the one with Sneaking Sally Through the Alley back in Maryland! I can wait.

So the other day after driving back home from the self-serve car wash to clean all of the salt off of my car (I guess why they call it Salt Lake City!), I took a slight detour and headed back to Randy’s Records to see what was available.

Again… a great selection but about the same price point as the other places.I just was not in the mood to drop a hundred bucks. I did not see many used records there, and the ones I did see were either expensive or I was not interested.

I was just about to leave the store feeling a bit defeated, but as I was walking out, a woman about my age was walking in with a large crate of LPs, presumably to sell. In my peripheral vision I could see that the album on top was Ram by Paul McCartney, one of my absolute favorite post Beatles albums!

The woman went right to the counter where the guy working there asked he if she was bringing them in to sell. Kind of a weird question, right? I mean why else would a woman be walking into this store with a crate of used records? I honest can’t think of one.

Anyway the guy took a cursory look at the crate of records and then told the woman that Jim in the back is the specialist and would be the one to determine the pricing. Jim came out of the back area, and started to look at some of the records. Besides Ram, I saw there was some Cat Stevens, Beatles, Allman Brothers, Doobie Brothers, John Lennon, and a lot more great artists. Each time he picked up a record, he gave her a reason why he could only pay a quarter for it. A few he said he may be able to give a dollar.

I was cringing. Because I would have paid her MUCH more that 25 cents for each of those records!!! If only the timing had been different and I would have seen her in the parking lot ten minutes earlier.

Jim then told the woman he was going to take the entire crate into the back and do a full evaluation, which would take about fifteen minutes. This is really high-level stuff I guess.

I was desperately trying to figure out a way to get a hold of those records because I would have paid MUCH more than the record store guy was hinting he’d pay. I did not know what to do.

While she was waiting for Jim to do his stuff, the woman started browsing some of the records in the store. I could tell that she had no interest in any of the records on the shelves. She was simply wasting time while her stack of records was being appraised.

I tried to make eye contact with her but no luck. So I figured I would just approach her and try to speak with her. But every time I followed her to an area of the store where I thought I could speak to her without the guy a the front counter overhearing, she would walk away from me almost like a magnet repelling another. This went on for several minutes.

I felt like a creep. Or a drug dealer. It was weird.

Finally the opportunity came. I cornered her in the back of the store. I threw her to the floor and got her in a strong body hold. No, just kidding. I didn’t do that! But I did approach her and got kind of close. This was VERY weird for me but I figured I had one shot.

I smiled at her and just said “Wow, I wish I would have seen you in the parking lot before you brought that crate of records in. I think we have the exact same taste in music. I would have given you cash!”

She was super nice. She explained how she was moving and she has had this crate of records in her home for many decades! I told her again that I really wanted them. She suggested that we both go up to the guy who was appraising them and tell him that I wanted to buy them. I said NO WAY, don’t do that! That would not work. I’d end up paying inflated retail.

When I was pretty sure that no one was looking, I looked at the woman and said very softly, “I have cash in my pocket. I don’t want to interfere with this transaction, but here’s what we can do. If you feel that Jim does not offer you what you want, just politely decline. Then I will be waiting outside and I will buy the entire crate from you.”

She looked at me and said “Sure. My car is the grey Toyota out front.”

So I waited outside. I spotted her car. Paced up and down the street a bit. I honestly felt like the creepiest of the creeps. Maybe like Robert Kraft feels as he is scoping out his next Asian Massage Parlor.

Ten minutes later, the woman emerges from the store, full crate of records in her arms. I saw her and she saw me. She whispered in my ear something crazy. “They were only willing to pay me $27 for this entire crate of records, so I just told them I was going to give them to my brother instead.”

I told her that I wanted them, but did not want to make the transaction in front of the record store. So we decided to both drive over to a service station on the next block.

She told me her name was Marie. I assured Marie that I am a professional, actually a doc and I do not make a habit of stalking people in record stores. She smiled and said that she is an ex-police officer with Salt Lake City and had a pretty good intuition that I was safe.

Holy SHIT. A “back room” deal with a cop!!!

She opened the back of her car. The crate of records was right there and it was beautiful. I told her that I was not going to look through all of the records. I didn’t care if some were scratched. I just wanted that stack.

As I was looking through I was salivating. Besides the ones I told you about earlier, there were Rolling Stones, Three Dog Night, Jim Croce, Loggins and Messina,

I looked at Marie and point blank asked her how much she wanted for the crate of vinyl records. She said she didn’t know. Knowing that she took a chance on me, I wanted to be generous. Remember, it would cost me about $25 a pop for a new LP just inside the record store. So I opened up my wallet and handed her $70. Marie said that was way too much and kindly gave me back a twenty dollar bill.

“$50 and we have a deal, but I cannot let you have the crate. I really need it for my move,” she said.

I was kidding around with her and replied “So how am I going to carry all of these records without the crate?”

“OK, the crate is yours! Enjoy!”

We exchanged contact information and we have been in touch with each other ever since. Marie changed my life just a little bit on that special day. I will NEVER forget her. I have a new friend in Salt Lake City. And a crate full of albums!  -DMM

The Turntable – Part 1

I am a baby boomer. I grew up in tough times. The 60s were unlike any decade known to man. The Vietnam War, riots, assassinations, hippies, protests, Woodstock, The Beatles, Dylan, drugs, love-ins, and so much more. As turbulent as these times were, one thing was for sure… a lot of great music came out of this era. Fantastic music.

Music became my life at a young age partly because so many other things were bad. I felt lost in high school. I matured much later than most of my classmates (physically and mentally). I still looked like a little kid while the guys were growing facial hair and the girls were growing breasts. Even though I had a few close friends, I didn’t really date much nor did I have any true direction in life. A lot of music and a little bit of weed got me through.

I have vivid memories of sitting on my bed, listening to The White Album on vinyl, staring at and playing with the cover as well as all of the contents. The cracks, pops and hisses were just right. I had a little Zenith “all in one” turntable and speaker system that I had received as a gift for my Bar Mitzvah. It was cheap but I loved it.

When I got my drivers license I would take off on road trips to every record store I could possibly get to. The semi annual EJ Korvettes “all label sale” was the time I seriously added to my collection. I remember buying up so many albums during these sales – I think they were three or four bucks each! “For The Record” at The Reisterstown Road Plaza, Luskins on the big hill, The Music Machine in Pikesville, Record and Tape Traders, Chicks Legendary Records in Mt. Washington… these were my favorite record shops back in my high school days.

That Bar Mitzvah Zenith stereo actually took me through college. At least the first two years when I went to a small school (Randolph-Macon) in Ashland, Virginia. I left R-MC on bad terms after getting caught hitting a full professor with a water balloon thrown from the second floor of Moreland Hall. So I came back home to Maryland and entered UMBC. When I finally saved a little money from being home, I upgraded to a Technics turntable, a Harmon Kardon receiver and Avid speakers. Life was still not great for me but the music sounded better!

I spent decades buying albums. The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, Yes, Emerson Lake and Palmer, Jethro Tull, Sparks, Elvis Costello, The Clash, Stevie Wonder, The Doobie Brothers, Elton John, The Who. I probably had at least four copies of The Beatles White Album. It was my life. It would not have been unusual for me to stare at a single album cover, inside and out, for hours and hours. That showed one of two things: that I had nothing else going on in my life or that I was stoned! Maybe a combination.

Then of course came cassettes, eight track tape and reel to reel. I am not going to talk much about them because a decade or so later this incredible new thing called the CD came out. Digital format was here. Radio stations bragged when they played a song on CD. I was intrigued. We were told that the CD would take over vinyl. CDs would take over the world. I spent my time at The Record Theatre, a huge warehouse type store that opened on Liberty Road just below the Beltway. They sold all the CDs you’d ever want. Yes, it was like a gigantic theatre filled with music! I made weekly trips there as I was replacing most of my favorite albums to CD. They sounded so “perfect.” Almost too perfect. And for a couple of decades that’s what we all listened to.

Enter mp3s and the iPod. I loved it. Thousands of songs at my fingertips. I could take this thing anywhere I went and was able to listen to music on the go. If someone back in college told me this would be possible one day, to have an entire record collection in a pocket device, I would have driven them right to the mental hospital.

Things got even better once music streaming started. Apple Music and Spotify entered my life. I no longer needed to “own” any physical albums or CDs. Everything was online for about ten bucks a month. Attention spans became short when millions of songs were at my fingertips. I mean I could basically listen to ANY song on demand, whenever I wanted to from a little device called an iPhone that I carried everywhere, including the bathroom.

But over the years, even with this great quality and millions of songs available to me, I felt as if something was missing.

My last turntable bit the dust somewhere around the year 2000. I donated it to some lucky individual. Close to twenty years later I started wondering what it would be like to play my vinyl again. I missed the few Bob Dylan albums I had on vinyl. And my Beatles. And Tull. I have most of them stored in a dusty back room of my office back in Maryland. As you know, I am in Utah now.

But two weeks ago something weird happened. I was driving down 900 S in Salt Lake City on my way to The Vertical Diner for some brunch. I passed a place called Randy’s Records. Big sign out front saying “Vinyl Records Since 1976.” I have passed this place a million times. But this time something just drew me in.

Randy’s Records is a fairly small store chock full of vinyl LPs and hipsters. Guys with flannel shirts and beards who likely only know about LP record albums from their parents and grandparents. Kids who now think vinyl is different and cool. I started looking around at all of the records. Many were new and a few were used. I started browsing the shelves. I felt the albums. The smell of the vinyl and the record jackets brought back memories of my past. When I saw The Beatles, Led Zepplin, Wings, Jethro Tull albums, I knew I was onto something. Ziggy Stardust was staring back at me begging me to touch him. John Lennon was asking me to give peace a chance. I actually started reading the cover of Thick as a Brick just as if it was the newspaper from 1972.

Then I saw a sign that said that they sell turntables. Right there I was done. I placed my Southwest Visa card on the counter and asked the guy to please bring me out the Bluetooth Audio-technica turntable for $139. Oh, and please add in the double rock opera album Tommy by The Who for $35. Ziggy Stardust can wait until next time.

I ate a fast brunch. Afterwards I high tailed it back home, ripped the turntable out of the box and had it all set up without reading any directions. I put Tommy on the turntable and something happened. The music came alive. I could not stop staring at the large disc going round and round as the sound was emanating from my Bluetooth powered speakers in the kitchen.

“Tommy Can You Hear Me?”

A single tear dripped down from my left eye.

“Tommy Can You Hear Me?”

I was literally re-living my youth. As good or as bad as it was. -DMM

Going Viral

I used to dream of something of mine going viral. A video I posted to Facebook or YouTube. A clever tweet. A cool pic on Instagram. Actually, dream may not be the best word. Obsess would be more accurate.

To date, nothing of mine has even come close to going viral.

And that’s ok.

I sit back and think, what would have actually changed in my life if a video had gone viral? Probably nothing. It would have been a short, quick high and that’s it.

Even worse, if something went viral, I would likely be searching for that next “high,” and if it did not come, I would sink really low. That sounds more like a virus, right?

These days what I care about is the quality of my life. I am happy. I am healthy. I have enough money to pay my bills and put some food on the table.

I am on Facebook less and less every day. And my life feels better and better. It’s amazing how much time is now freed up for me to do what I want.

At 63, I play a lot more than I work. Much more. I ski several times per week in the winter. I get out and hike or run when I am not skiing. I spend time with the people who I love – those who are important to me.

When the weather warms up I’ll be driving Sarani (our little RV) around and exploring more of this country with my wife and our cat.

I think I can say my life has become “viral.” Not because I have a million followers. I don’t! It’s viral because I am doing exactly what I want as well as helping other people. If I change ONE LIFE from this article, my job is done. Two would be even better!

So here is my advice. Get out and play. Do what you love. Make some money but you don’t have to overdo it. Make only what you really need.

Life is short my friends. Give. Giving is powerful. Sometimes even do it anonymously. Help others. If you live way below your means and you save, invest and give, you will ultimately be wealthy in so many ways.

Now THAT’S viral! -DMM

Six Ways to Be Constantly Improving

A few years ago I decided to do stand-up comedy at a local comedy club. I sat down and carefully wrote a really funny five minute set.

I went on stage. I performed. I sucked.

I mean I REALLY sucked. If the audience could have thrown stuff at me, I think they would have. But I was OK. I went back and did it again. And again!

Then there was the time I remember doing pull-ups on a New York subway. Pull-ups are difficult, especially with a backpack on. I could only do three or four really good pull-ups. People watched. Some people thought it was cool. Others were calling me names. Most ignored me in the end!

Sometimes depending on my mood, I will make conversation with a perfect stranger.

I keep attempting to go a little further outside of my comfort zone. Every day I try to do what I call a “dare of the day.” Sometimes they work and sometimes they don’t. If they don’t work, I am fine.

How about you? Do you frequently step outside of your comfort zone? Or do you always stay “safe?”

From now on try saying the opinion that is your truth. Don’t worry or care if people will hate it. Be you.

Get scared! At least a little.

Say “yes” to a talk if you are afraid of public speaking.

Contact the person you lost touch with.

Ask out your secret crush. (Unless you are married!)

Do some pull-ups or push-ups in a public place! Or a yoga pose!

Or how about THIS: next time you buy a coffee, ask for 10% off. Don’t give a reason. Just look the clerk in the eyes, ask and wait for the response.

Think of some other small ways to push the boundaries of comfort! Tell me. Give me some “dares of the day.” Maybe I’ll publish them! If they are great, maybe I’ll try them!

This, plus what’s in the image below, is how I improve myself every day.

I feel very blessed to be who I am. It’s hard work to step out of your comfort zone. It’s painful. It’s suffering. But it’s worth it. Trust me, it’s worth it. -DMM

 

We’re All on the Same Team!

How often do you encounter a jerk in a restaurant? On a plane? On the road? They’re all over!

You know exactly what I mean. Someone who is rude, talking way too loud, being an a-hole, disrespectful, or just generally rubbing you the wrong way.

Let’s face it. It happens. Maybe it happens more to me because I am so sensitive. I suck up energy from others, whether it’s good or bad. I really believe I am an empath. Look that up if you do not know what it is. But I digress.

A powerful thought hit me a while back, which got me thinking more about this topic. I realized that in case of any emergency, whether it would be something that happened to me personally, someone else, or a general disaster that affected many people, most of us would come to the aid of our fellow human beings.

For example, if I had a stroke in a restaurant (God-forbid), that loudmouth at the next table may very well be medically trained to help me. And if he was not medically trained, at the very least he would be likely to call 911 or assist in some way until the EMTs showed up.

The guy who used to piss me off leaning his chair back into my lap on the plane would likely help his fellow passengers if there were some type of emergency that took place. He could be a great guy but maybe he just likes to lean back!

And I know for sure if there were some type of natural or unnatural disaster (flood, fire, attack, etc.) we would ALL help each other out any way we could.

Now I have learned to be much more tolerant towards other people. Sure, it’s pretty annoying when the woman at the next table in the Thai restaurant has such a loud piercing voice that I can’t even hear my own wife speaking (thus we have to resort to texting), but she would probably be there to help Yoko (my wife) if she was choking on some food. (This just happened last night but thankfully Yoko was not choking!)

So let’s keep one thing in mind. Sure, we may get distracted with annoying people, or at least people who we feel are annoying, but in the end, we are all on the same team. When we remember this, it puts a whole new perspective on how we feel about our fellow human beings. -DMM

Don’t Outsource Your Happiness

I hate thinking about stocks. I used to outsource my happiness to the moves of the stock market. When the market was up, I was on a high. When it skyrocketed, it was a tremendous high. But when it was down, I was miserable. It was like a very powerful drug. Sometimes in the same day I would be up and down and up and down.

It actually got so bad, I decided this past fall (when the market started to tumble) that enough is enough. I knew in my heart that it makes no difference what the market does on a daily, monthly, or even yearly basis if I am in it for the long haul.

And I am.

So a few months ago I made a deal with myself that I would not check anything until the year ended. And I have stuck to this pretty well. Now I will likely check my investments on a quarterly basis at most. As long as I have my regular cash flow to live on, it makes no difference what the market is doing! This will give me tremendous peace of mind. I am actually feeling a LOT better already!

Is there anything that changes YOUR mood easily? I am betting there is. Here are a few possibilities (tell me if you relate to any of them): An argument with someone, your weight, your car breaking down, the news, politics, a coworker, Facebook, Instagram, debt, the weather, a memory, your hair. I am sure there are tons more.

My suggestion is to be in control of your happiness. We cannot control many of the things above, but try your absolute BEST not to let these outside interferences affect your actual happiness. I removed the stock market from my daily routine. It has seriously helped me. What will YOU remove? -DMM

Blog – Welcome!

WELCOME!

DARE TO CHANGE?

Hello, I am Dr. David Madow! I am a “plant based” athlete, author, podcaster, professional speaker and lifestyle coach!  I have been helping countless people just like you change the direction in which their lives were headed.

If you are in a rut and are looking for change, you have come to the right place. I will help you work through lifestyle issues that you have been struggling with.

Stick with me here if you want to be…

  • Happier
  • At peace with yourself
  • More confident
  • Less anxious
  • Less stressed
  • Stronger
  • Thinner
  • Healthier
  • More spiritual

If you do not like the way you look or feel, if you are in a dead-end relationship, a job that you do not love, or if your life consists of looking forward to weekends, happy hours and vacations, then you are in the right place!

I can help you achieve practically anything you want in life. Your dreams can and will come true. I promise!

How do I know?

Because I have experienced everything in life from the very bottom to the tippity top.

I have been poor and I have been wealthy.

I have been sick and I have been in great health.

I have been through career changes. I was bullied in school. I was uncomfortable in social situations. I have been depressed. I ate and gained weight to lessen pain. I had feelings of being worthless. I had severe family issues. You name it and chances are I have experienced it. I have been through so much crap in my life, I could write another book. And I may do that one day!

But for now, there is something better! I have developed this site for YOU!

Because here’s the good news.

I figured out how to get all of the bad stuff out of my life!

Every single bit of it!